Iced Fudge Lollies

 

Popsicle molds are inexpensive, but don’t hesitate to turn the whole batch into a large container and serve it as sorbet.

Let’s keep this short and sweet: these frozen pops are indecently delicious and easy. The angels had to be on Sally’s shoulders when she conjured this one up.

There’s such an intense hit of chocolate you won’t believe there’s not a jot of fat in them, and they’re just the comic relief needed at the end of an impressive meal.

Cook to Cook: High-quality cocoa is a must here to get that velvety can’t-be-fat-free texture (Pernigotti, Valrhona, and Michel Cluizel are some worth looking for). And don’t forget the pinch of saltit really lifts the flavor.

Ingredients
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup high-quality cocoa
  • 1/2 vanilla bean, split
  • Pinch of salt 
Instructions

1. In a 3-quart saucepan over medium heat, dissolve the sugar in 2 cups of water. Once dissolved, whisk in the cocoa, vanilla and salt. Bring to a simmer and cook for 3 to 5 minutes until the mixture thickens slightly and is smooth.

2. Remove from the heat, then remove the vanilla bean and cool. Pour the mixture into popsicle molds and freeze.

Variation: Try coating the tips of the lollies with nuts or coconut by packing it in the bottoms of the mold before pouring in the chocolate mixture.

From The Splendid Table®'s How to Eat Weekends by Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift (Clarkson Potter, 2011), © copyright 2011 American Public Media.

Prep time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 
6 to 8 pops; doubles easily
  • Nordic cuisine: Leave the herring, take the taco quiche

    With almost 800 pages of recipes and striking photography, Magnus Nilsson's The Nordic Cookbook is the definitive work on the food cultures of his native land. He spoke with Melissa Clark about the impact winter has on the Nordic countries, the common source of everyone's family herring recipe, and the enduring popularity of taco quiche.

Top Recipes

Reviving an 8,000-year-old winemaking tradition in Georgia

John Wurdeman studied music and art before becoming a winemaker in the country of Georgia. His winery, Pheasant's Tears, has revived an 8,000-year-old Georgian winemaking tradition. He tells Melissa Clark what brought him there, the myriad varieties of Georgian wines, and the integral part they play in that country's meals.