Sally Swift

Sally Swift is the managing producer and co-creator of The Splendid Table. Before developing the show, she worked in film, video and television, including stints at Twin Cities Public Television, Paisley Park and Comic Relief with Billy Crystal. She also survived a stint as segment producer on The Jenny Jones Show.

Sally began her love affair with radio when A Prairie Home Companion recorded a series of television shows for Disney, and she has never looked back. In 1998 and 2008, she was awarded the James Beard Award for Best National Radio Show. In 2000, she received the Gracie Allen Award for Best Syndicated Talk Show. She is a four-time recipient (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 ) of the Clarion Award from Women in Communications.

She is co-author with Lynne Rossetto Kasper of The Splendid Table's How To Eat Supper: Recipes, Stories and Opinions from Public Radio's Award-Winning Food Show, and its sister book, the James Beard Award nominee, How To Eat Weekends: New Recipes, Stories and Opinions, as well as A Summertime Grilling Guide from The Splendid Table

Content By This Author

It's a classic dish from Mexico's Yucatan but a bit on the unusual side for non-Hispanic palates.

You know those delicious, over-charred ears of grilled corn you eat at county fairs in the summer? If you are like us and request the ones with the most burned bits, this recipe is for you.

The Washington Post's Bonnie Benwick tracked down an authentic recipe for toum, the garlic paste from Lebanon.
Karl Vogel, a married father of three who loves to cook from Lincoln, Nebraska, challenges Lynne to make a dish from tilapia filets, rolled oats, baby carrots, almond butter and garlic.

Gather up lobster shells and head to the stove for a simple and luxurious lesson in stock making. The briny essence of the sea that is captured in those shells is yours with a few simple steps. 

Two whole chickens, propped up on vertical roasters, rubbed with spices, and leisurely cooked and smoked over an indirect fire.

Whip up this easy garlic paste on the weekend and dip into it all week long.
In the kitchen there are unwritten rules we follow. But what's the science behind these rules? Tim Cebula, senior food editor at Cooking Light and co-author of "Why You Dredge, Rest, Pulse, and Process," explains.

Sweet and crisp, raw sugar snap peas are hard to resist. In this recipe they are chopped into bite-size pieces and paired with crispy chunks of radish, a bit of mint and crumbles of smooth, creamy, fresh cheese. 

So light, creamy and fresh, the ravioli have the subtlest of sauces.

In her cooking classes at Purple Kale Kitchenworks in Brooklyn, New York, chef Ronna Welsh teaches sustainable and creative ways of wasting less.

Gather up everything there is to love about Vietnamese food and put it in one dish and you'd probably have this salad.

Make up to 3 days ahead and refrigerate. Have the sauce at room temperature before using.

Really a main dish cheesecake wrapped in incredibly buttery phyllo, the genius is in the shape -- a Bundt ring that stands golden and proud. 

A pan sauce takes maybe five minutes, and it's an easy and sexy finish to anything you oven or pan roast. Rarely is there a lot of pan sauce, but what you create can be so intense you won't want more than a spoonful over your dish.
David Rosengarten visited Pantelleria, Italy, or "caper heaven." He explains the difference between caper buds and berries and debunks a caper food myth that just won't go away.