Lynne Rossetto Kasper

Lynne Rossetto Kasper has won numerous awards as host of The Splendid Table, including two James Beard Foundation Awards (1998, 2008) for Best National Radio Show on Food, five Clarion Awards (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014) from Women in Communication, and a Gracie Allen Award in 2000 for Best Syndicated Talk Show. Lynne is a respected authority on food, having published multiple bestselling books: The Splendid Table; The Italian Country Table; a series of quarterly e-books, Eating In with Lynne Rossetto Kasper, as well as the best-selling  The Splendid Table's How To Eat Supper, How To Eat Weekends and A Summertime Grilling Guide, which were co-authored with founding producer Sally Swift. The Splendid Table can be heard on more than 300 public radio stations nationwide.

 

Content By This Author

Claudia Roden, author of Arabesque, explains the variations of kofta.
For chef Julia Child, Fourth of July would not be complete without potato salad. She shares how she makes hers.
When it comes to cooking vegetables the Italian way, chef Mario Batali says it's important to seek out products that are local and in season. Plus, you need a really hot pan.
Paul Quinn College was in the middle of a food desert. Its football team kept losing -- badly. So in 2010, the Dallas college decided to transform its football field into The We Over Me Farm.
Each year we remove 170 billion pounds of fish and shellfish from the ocean, according to Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish. He says we need to back away from industrial fishing, which has put some species of fish in danger.
Nongkran Daks, author of Nong's Thai Kitchen, has been making Thai curries since she was 7 years old.
National Geographic Fellow Dan Buettner went around the world in search of communities where people live the longest. "The goal of the project was to, in a sense, reverse engineer longevity," he says.
Richard Wrangham, a professor at Harvard University and author of Catching Fire, studies the role of cooking in human evolution.
Like the radish, radish leaves are best eaten young and in great shape.
While doing research for his book Pig Tales, author Barry Estabrook visited a farmer in Iowa who raised 150,000 pigs a year. What he saw at this factory farm -- which is the way 97 percent of pigs in the U.S. are raised -- is a far cry from Old MacDonald's.

Don’t let summer get away from you without trying this. Then again, it is pretty swell in winter, too.

No matter what time of year it is, Elizabeth Millard always has fresh vegetables. The author of Indoor Kitchen Gardening grows everything from carrots to kale inside.
Neil Kelley, a research fellow at the Smithsonian, explains what we can learn about animals' diets from studying their skull and teeth.
Jeremy Nolen, co-author of New German Cooking with Jessica Nolen, says German food has "a lot more vegetables and lighter, cleaner flavors" than most Americans realize.
It takes 1 gallon of water to grow a single almond, according to Tom Philpott, food and agriculture correspondent for Mother Jones and author of "California Goes Nuts." Eighty percent of the world's almonds are grown in California, which is experiencing a severe drought.
Violinist Joshua Bell learns how to make Tagliatelle with Caramelized Oranges and Almonds.
Lentil Underground, by Liz Carlisle, is the story of a group of farmers in Montana who broke free of the industrial farming system by growing organic lentils.
Buy your olives where you can taste before deciding. Plus, Lynne shares her ultimate olive party collection.
California olive oils may not be as familiar to us as olive oil from Italy, Spain and Greece. Lynne blind tastes six California olive oils and selects her favorite.
In 1966 David Lett and his wife, Diana, spent their honeymoon planting the first commercial pinot noir grapes in Oregon. "I wanted to make the great American pinot noir," Lett says. That was the start of The Eyrie Vineyards, which went on to attain cult status.
While living on her own for the first time, Lisa Gross had a fantasy: Wouldn't it be amazing if you could learn to cook in the home kitchens of people from all over the world?
The difference between a wine that is simply unappealing and one that is spoiled is pretty obvious. It all comes down to scent and taste.
Louise Hay and Heather Dane, co-authors of the book Loving Yourself to Great Health with Ahlea Khadro, explore the connection between digestive and emotional health.
We don't think of roasting beans, but with olive oil, seasonings and a flash of high heat, they turn into another experience.
"There are more than 1,000 different chemicals that elicit a bitter response," says Jennifer McLagan, author of Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, with Recipes.
The trick of swirling a little butter into the winter greens as you take them off the stove delivers a lot more fresh butter lushness than you'd expect.