Lynne Rossetto Kasper

Lynne Rossetto Kasper has won numerous awards as host of The Splendid Table, including two James Beard Foundation Awards (1998, 2008) for Best National Radio Show on Food, five Clarion Awards (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014) from Women in Communication, and a Gracie Allen Award in 2000 for Best Syndicated Talk Show. Lynne is a respected authority on food, having published multiple bestselling books: The Splendid Table; The Italian Country Table; a series of quarterly e-books, Eating In with Lynne Rossetto Kasper, as well as the best-selling  The Splendid Table's How To Eat Supper, How To Eat Weekends and A Summertime Grilling Guide, which were co-authored with founding producer Sally Swift. The Splendid Table can be heard on more than 300 public radio stations nationwide.


Content By This Author

If you are headed to someone's house this Thanksgiving, Bon Appetit's editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport has you covered. "You can't just show up with a bottle of wine," he says. "You need to think about it."
Jane and Michael Stern of weigh in on the regional differences they have discovered around the country on Thanksgiving.
Chef Vikas Khanna, author of Indian Harvest, shares a vegetarian Thanksgiving menu and explains why he once found inspiration in Jonathan Livingston Seagull.
Journalist Anna Badkhen has spent years covering war zones like Afghanistan and Iraq. In her book Peace Meals, she says she "felt the need to explain to people who are so far removed from war zones that people on the other side are very much like them."
"Often you find that there are ways you can improve techniques or recipes," says J. Kenji López-Alt, author of The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science.
"I really don't eat another tomato between my last one picked in say September and the first one picked in June unless they're canned, sun-dried or preserved in some way," says Craig LeHoullier, author of Epic Tomatoes.
Chef Daniel Patterson makes a strong case against using tongs in the kitchen. "There is nothing that is better suited to toss a salad than your hands," he says.
"If there's a set of values in Senegal, teranga would be the most important one," says chef Pierre Thiam, author of Senegal. "It's the way you treat the guest."

Roasting the chiles, onions and garlic is the secret to the depth and rich taste of this sauce.

Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day started as Leanne Brown's thesis project for her master's in food studies at New York University. "$4 a day means something really specific," Brown says.
Cathy Erway, author of The Food of Taiwan, shares the distinctive tastes of Taiwanese cuisine.
Darra Goldstein is editor in chief of The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets, an 888-page reference guide to all things sweet.
Keith Wilson is the curator of the exhibit "Ancient Chinese Jades and Bronzes" at the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The exhibit includes a variety of Chinese wine vessels from the period between 1200 and 1000 B.C.E. that were used for ceremonial banquets.
"The most delicious things that we make are often things that are grown in and around our world," says chef Mario Batali, a champion of eating local. One of the best places to find local produce? A farmers market.

A coconut-milk curry scented with lemongrass and ginger.

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are a contentious issue, and Mark Lynas has been on both sides of the debate. He is the author of "How I Got Converted to G.M.O. Food."
Just an hour-and-a-half outside of Rome, Abruzzo is an agricultural breadbasket that doesn't make the itinerary of most tourists to Italy.

Here we take toothy chunks of carrots, parboil them, fast roast them in the oven with allspice, and finish them off with a garnish of minced preserved lemon and fresh garlic.

This was my first taste of the south of France.

To experience gelato the way Italians eat it, have it from a tub where it's not frozen solid.

Fire-sizzled, perfectly crusty outside and pink inside -- there is nothing like a giant steak.

This lamb can be your savior on those evenings when you’ve got a bunch of strangers around the table.

Beguiling as a French fry, but with so much more charisma.

Don’t let summer get away from you without trying this. Then again, it is pretty swell in winter, too.

Claudia Roden, author of Arabesque, explains the variations of kofta.
For chef Julia Child, Fourth of July would not be complete without potato salad. She shares how she makes hers.
When it comes to cooking vegetables the Italian way, chef Mario Batali says it's important to seek out products that are local and in season. Plus, you need a really hot pan.
Paul Quinn College was in the middle of a food desert. Its football team kept losing -- badly. So in 2010, the Dallas college decided to transform its football field into The We Over Me Farm.
Each year we remove 170 billion pounds of fish and shellfish from the ocean, according to Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish. He says we need to back away from industrial fishing, which has put some species of fish in danger.