Lynne Rossetto Kasper

Lynne Rossetto Kasper has won numerous awards as host of The Splendid Table, including two James Beard Foundation Awards (1998, 2008) for Best National Radio Show on Food, five Clarion Awards (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014) from Women in Communication, and a Gracie Allen Award in 2000 for Best Syndicated Talk Show. Lynne is a respected authority on food, having published multiple bestselling books: The Splendid Table; The Italian Country Table; a series of quarterly e-books, Eating In with Lynne Rossetto Kasper, as well as the best-selling  The Splendid Table's How To Eat Supper, How To Eat Weekends and A Summertime Grilling Guide, which were co-authored with founding producer Sally Swift. The Splendid Table can be heard on more than 300 public radio stations nationwide.

 

Content By This Author

A first-rate soup is easy to make with a good stock. But can a stock you buy at the grocery store equal -- or even surpass -- homemade stock?
Dry your own mushrooms, which will keep for 6-8 months.
Rowland Archer from Wake Forest, North Carolina, challenges Lynne to make a dish from fresh blueberries, canned white albacore tuna, leftover cooked angel hair pasta, fresh tomatoes and rind from Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.
Earthy-tasting vegetables like rutabaga and turnips sweeten with roasting, especially if you mix them up with sweet potatoes and onions.
"The most delicious things that we make are often things that are grown in and around our world. It's not necessarily fancy or hard to get; it's just a question of sourcing it," says chef Mario Batali, co-author of America Farm to Table.
Tricia Michaelis from Dickinson, North Dakota, challenges Lynne to make a dish from asparagus, lemon, boneless chicken breasts, carrots and raspberry preserves.
Chef Dan Barber, author of The Third Plate, says we need a food system that is both delicious and sustainable. "It's about the system that supports a whole ecology," he says.
Whether you are starting out or starting over with your cookware and cutlery, you’ll want to consider investing in these eight items.
These days, it seems like almost everything is served with a splash of sriracha or a side of pickles -- funky, spicy, tangy, bold flavors are taking over. Kate Krader, restaurant editor at Food & Wine, talks about her story, "Are Big Flavors Destroying the American Palate?"
In Vietnamese "banh mi" means bread, but "over time it has become known as the ubiquitous Vietnamese sandwich," says Andrea Nguyen, author of The Banh Mi Handbook. She explains the basics of banh mi.
With its fragrance of sweet lemon, it's easy to fall for lemon basil.
Andrea Nguyen, author of Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, explains how to make cool Vietnamese noodle salads.
"Water is your enemy in ice cream," says Jeni Britton Bauer, author of Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home. "That's what turns into ice." She shares her tips for fighting the enemy when making ice cream at home.
Cheryl Ahuja, a mother of one from Marietta, Georgia, challenges Lynne to make a dish from cucumber, onion, cream cheese, Brussels sprouts and celery.

It's a classic dish from Mexico's Yucatan but a bit on the unusual side for non-Hispanic palates.

This tart has crunch, creaminess and spiced green tomatoes.
Are you making the same marinade for grilling day after day? Lynne suggests three spice rubs to try.

This cross between a fruit ice and a sorbet sidesteps the usual sorbet formula of sugar syrup and smoothing out in an ice cream machine. 

You know those delicious, over-charred ears of grilled corn you eat at county fairs in the summer? If you are like us and request the ones with the most burned bits, this recipe is for you.

When Sami Scripter was working on Cooking from the Heart, she discovered the Hmong people's strong oral tradition: "I had more than one grandmother tell me, 'We don't need to write it down. We know how to do our cooking.'"
Nigella Lawson, author of Nigellissima, has seven suggestions for using fruit that is not quite ripe enough or past its prime.
When it comes to selecting a melon, trust your nose.
Moutarde de Meaux is one of the great mustards of the world. It's mild -- you can eat it with a spoon -- but it has flavor.
New York chef Melissa Daka, owner of Eolo and Pastai, says wines from Sicily's Mount Etna are "intense just like the fireworks of the lava that spits out of the volcano."
Chef Daniel Klein and camerawoman Mirra Fine of the weekly, online documentary series The Perennial Plate learned about farming teff in Ethiopia.
Karl Vogel, a married father of three who loves to cook from Lincoln, Nebraska, challenges Lynne to make a dish from tilapia filets, rolled oats, baby carrots, almond butter and garlic.
Fred Plotkin is the author of the classic guide Italy for the Gourmet Traveler. He suggests three towns where visitors can experience what he calls "the real Italy."
How do you feed 9 billion people? That's an estimate of how many people will be living on the planet in 40 years. Dennis Dimick, the executive editor of National Geographic, explains Jonathan Foley's article "A Five-Step Plan to Feed the World."
Dip grilled meats and vegetables into this at the table. The vinegar goes into sauces, livens up gazpacho and sparks drinks.
Roadfood, by Jane and Michael Stern, was published in 1977 and became a classic that is now in its ninth edition. Michael says regional food is "a national legacy, a heritage that's well worth preserving."