Lynne Rossetto Kasper

Lynne Rossetto Kasper has won numerous awards as host of The Splendid Table, including two James Beard Foundation Awards (1998, 2008) for Best National Radio Show on Food, five Clarion Awards (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014) from Women in Communication, and a Gracie Allen Award in 2000 for Best Syndicated Talk Show. Lynne is a respected authority on food, having published multiple bestselling books: The Splendid Table; The Italian Country Table; a series of quarterly e-books, Eating In with Lynne Rossetto Kasper, as well as the best-selling  The Splendid Table's How To Eat Supper, How To Eat Weekends and A Summertime Grilling Guide, which were co-authored with founding producer Sally Swift. The Splendid Table can be heard on more than 300 public radio stations nationwide.

 

Content By This Author

When it comes to holiday cooking, Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift like to keep it simple.
Aaron Cotkin, a graduate student in San Diego, challenges Lynne to make a dish from frozen Korean peanut rice balls, baby bella mushrooms, Greek yogurt, canned green beans and frozen sockeye salmon filets.

This lamb can be your savior on those evenings when you’ve got a bunch of strangers around the table.

Not only does flour thicken a liquid, but when you reheat the liquid, it will remain thick.
In Cuba, ingredients for cooking haven't always been easy to come by. Cuban-American food writer Ana Sofia Pelaez and American photographer Ellen Silverman explored the country's cuisine. Their book is The Cuban Table.
Ray Isle, executive wine editor of Food & Wine magazine, lists four classic wines that define regions around the world.
To throw a party you just need zakuski, the Russian equivalent of Italian antipasti, and plenty of vodka, according to British food writer Diana Henry. She is the author of Roast Figs Sugar Snow: Winter Food to Warm the Soul.
Pumpkin pie is going to grandma’s house over that river; it’s a warm fire on a winter night; it’s pure, sweet, spicy comfort in a crust; it’s what bourbon was aged for.
This Thanksgiving Adam Rapoport, editor in chief of Bon Appetit, is taking a stand against pumpkin pie. "I don't want to eat it," he says. "I'm done with pumpkin pie."
Shalon Hastings, a restaurateur from Helena, Montana, challenges Lynne to make a dish from duck fat, whole chicken, tamarind paste, fermented black beans and homemade fig jam.
In the U.S. $162 billion worth of food isn't eaten annually. "An American family of four wastes 1,160 pounds of food a year," says Elizabeth Royte, who wrote "The High Cost of Food Waste" for National Geographic.
Actor Stanley Tucci has always cooked. But he says it wasn't until starring in the film Big Night that he "started to take a real, real interest in it." He wrote The Tucci Table with his wife, Felicity Blunt.

The problem with pumpkin pie is pumpkin. Most pumpkins teeter toward tasteless. Instead, roast butternut squash and you get lush sweetness and kicks of caramel.

Before serving decorate with whipped cream and sprinkle with pecans. 

Ina Lipkowitz, author of Words To Eat By: Five Foods and the Culinary History of the English Language, says, "Can you imagine if instead of meatloaf we called it fleshloaf? That would sound terrible. What we call food matters."
Jacques Pepin has full master's status as a culinary groundbreaker, a TV star and a consummate teacher. He says when it comes to cooking a hot dog, a lobster roll or a BLT, "There is always a better way of doing it. There is a better way of doing anything."
Chef Vikas Khanna created the Holy Kitchens film series, which focuses on seven different religions. "We don't talk about religion in the films, we just talk about food," he says.

If you can boil water, you can make great rice. 

A lush, yet light dessert that's much better if made a day ahead.

In the TV series Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution, Jamie Oliver set out to change how the entire city of Huntington, West Virginia, ate. Journalists Jane Black and Brent Cunningham wondered about the show's aftermath.
Jim Gaffigan is a comedian who loves to eat -- except for vegetables. "Generally I'm not a fan," he says. Food figures large in his latest book, Food: A Love Story.
A first-rate soup is easy to make with a good stock. But can a stock you buy at the grocery store equal -- or even surpass -- homemade stock?
Dry your own mushrooms, which will keep for 6-8 months.
Rowland Archer from Wake Forest, North Carolina, challenges Lynne to make a dish from fresh blueberries, canned white albacore tuna, leftover cooked angel hair pasta, fresh tomatoes and rind from Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.
Earthy-tasting vegetables like rutabaga and turnips sweeten with roasting, especially if you mix them up with sweet potatoes and onions.
"The most delicious things that we make are often things that are grown in and around our world. It's not necessarily fancy or hard to get; it's just a question of sourcing it," says chef Mario Batali, co-author of America Farm to Table.
Tricia Michaelis from Dickinson, North Dakota, challenges Lynne to make a dish from asparagus, lemon, boneless chicken breasts, carrots and raspberry preserves.
Chef Dan Barber, author of The Third Plate, says we need a food system that is both delicious and sustainable. "It's about the system that supports a whole ecology," he says.