Lynne Rossetto Kasper

Lynne Rossetto Kasper has won numerous awards as host of The Splendid Table, including two James Beard Foundation Awards (1998, 2008) for Best National Radio Show on Food, five Clarion Awards (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014) from Women in Communication, and a Gracie Allen Award in 2000 for Best Syndicated Talk Show. Lynne is a respected authority on food, having published multiple bestselling books: The Splendid Table; The Italian Country Table; a series of quarterly e-books, Eating In with Lynne Rossetto Kasper, as well as the best-selling  The Splendid Table's How To Eat Supper, How To Eat Weekends and A Summertime Grilling Guide, which were co-authored with founding producer Sally Swift. The Splendid Table can be heard on more than 300 public radio stations nationwide.

 

Content By This Author

It takes 1 gallon of water to grow a single almond, according to Tom Philpott, food and agriculture correspondent for Mother Jones and author of "California Goes Nuts." Eighty percent of the world's almonds are grown in California, which is experiencing a severe drought.
Violinist Joshua Bell learns how to make Tagliatelle with Caramelized Oranges and Almonds.
Lentil Underground, by Liz Carlisle, is the story of a group of farmers in Montana who broke free of the industrial farming system by growing organic lentils.
Buy your olives where you can taste before deciding. Plus, Lynne shares her ultimate olive party collection.
California olive oils may not be as familiar to us as olive oil from Italy, Spain and Greece. Lynne blind tastes six California olive oils and selects her favorite.
In 1966 David Lett and his wife, Diana, spent their honeymoon planting the first commercial pinot noir grapes in Oregon. "I wanted to make the great American pinot noir," Lett says. That was the start of The Eyrie Vineyards, which went on to attain cult status.
While living on her own for the first time, Lisa Gross had a fantasy: Wouldn't it be amazing if you could learn to cook in the home kitchens of people from all over the world?
The difference between a wine that is simply unappealing and one that is spoiled is pretty obvious. It all comes down to scent and taste.
Louise Hay and Heather Dane, co-authors of the book Loving Yourself to Great Health with Ahlea Khadro, explore the connection between digestive and emotional health.
We don't think of roasting beans, but with olive oil, seasonings and a flash of high heat, they turn into another experience.
"There are more than 1,000 different chemicals that elicit a bitter response," says Jennifer McLagan, author of Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, with Recipes.
The trick of swirling a little butter into the winter greens as you take them off the stove delivers a lot more fresh butter lushness than you'd expect.
When it comes to holiday cooking, Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift like to keep it simple.
Aaron Cotkin, a graduate student in San Diego, challenges Lynne to make a dish from frozen Korean peanut rice balls, baby bella mushrooms, Greek yogurt, canned green beans and frozen sockeye salmon filets.

This lamb can be your savior on those evenings when you’ve got a bunch of strangers around the table.

Not only does flour thicken a liquid, but when you reheat the liquid, it will remain thick.
In Cuba, ingredients for cooking haven't always been easy to come by. Cuban-American food writer Ana Sofia Pelaez and American photographer Ellen Silverman explored the country's cuisine. Their book is The Cuban Table.
Ray Isle, executive wine editor of Food & Wine magazine, lists four classic wines that define regions around the world.
To throw a party you just need zakuski, the Russian equivalent of Italian antipasti, and plenty of vodka, according to British food writer Diana Henry. She is the author of Roast Figs Sugar Snow: Winter Food to Warm the Soul.
Pumpkin pie is going to grandma’s house over that river; it’s a warm fire on a winter night; it’s pure, sweet, spicy comfort in a crust; it’s what bourbon was aged for.
This Thanksgiving Adam Rapoport, editor in chief of Bon Appetit, is taking a stand against pumpkin pie. "I don't want to eat it," he says. "I'm done with pumpkin pie."
Shalon Hastings, a restaurateur from Helena, Montana, challenges Lynne to make a dish from duck fat, whole chicken, tamarind paste, fermented black beans and homemade fig jam.
In the U.S. $162 billion worth of food isn't eaten annually. "An American family of four wastes 1,160 pounds of food a year," says Elizabeth Royte, who wrote "The High Cost of Food Waste" for National Geographic.
Actor Stanley Tucci has always cooked. But he says it wasn't until starring in the film Big Night that he "started to take a real, real interest in it." He wrote The Tucci Table with his wife, Felicity Blunt.

The problem with pumpkin pie is pumpkin. Most pumpkins teeter toward tasteless. Instead, roast butternut squash and you get lush sweetness and kicks of caramel.

Before serving decorate with whipped cream and sprinkle with pecans.