Shrimp, Chile, and Potato Salad

David Loftus

Potatoes, chiles and shrimp sit so well together in this effortless, comforting salad. I like to eat it just as it is, but you could serve it as a side salad if you like. I have also made it with crab, lobster, and scallops—all work brilliantly. I make it quite spicy, so if you don’t like the heat, you might want to cut down on the chiles. It is really versatile, and can be served hot, warm, or cold. I love it!

Ingredients

  • 21 oz [600 g] large raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 14 oz [400 g] small new potatoes
  • Sunflower oil for cooking
  • 4 scallions, trimmed and sliced
  • 2 Tbsp finely sliced cilantro, plus extra leaves to serve
  • 1 Tbsp finely sliced mint, plus extra leaves to serve
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the sauce

  • Sunflower oil for cooking
  • 1 red onion, peeled and minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled, halved (germ removed) and chopped
  • 2 red chiles, seeded and chopped
  • 1 tsp black onion seeds [Ed. Note: black onion seeds have a bitter, pungent taste. They are a common ingredient in Bengali dishes and can be purchased from a variety of online stores.]
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 4 ripe tomatoes, core removed, seeded, and chopped
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Everyday Seafood Book CoverEveryday Seafood
by Nathan Outlaw

Directions

First make the sauce. Heat a skillet over medium heat and add a drizzle of sunflower oil. When it is hot, add the onion, garlic, chiles, and spices and fry for 3 to 4 minutes until the mixture begins to color. Add the chopped tomatoes, season with salt and pepper, and cook for 6 to 8 minutes until they begin to collapse.

Transfer the contents of the pan to a food processor, and blend until the mixture is as smooth as you can get it. Pass through a strainer into a clean bowl, and allow to cool.

Add the shrimp to the cooled sauce, and leave to marinate for at least 10 minutes, longer if you have the time.

To cook the new potatoes, put them into a pan, cover with water, and add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat, and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until they are cooked. Drain thoroughly, and leave to cool slightly while you cook the shrimp.

Heat a skillet over high heat. Remove the shrimp from the sauce with a slotted spoon, keeping the sauce. Add a drizzle of oil to the hot pan, then carefully add the shrimp, and cook for 2 minutes on each side.

Add the sauce to the pan, and bring to a simmer, then take off the heat. Stir in the scallions, cilantro, and mint. Now add the potatoes (or combine in a bowl if your pan is too small). Season the shrimp salad with salt and pepper to taste, and toss well.

Serve the salad scattered with extra cilantro and mint leaves, either on its own, or with a green salad if you prefer.

* * *

Recipe excerpted with permission from Everyday Seafood by Nathan Outlaw, published by Quadrille Publishing 2017. Food photography by David Loftus.

 

Yield: 
Serves 4 as an appetizer or light lunch
 
  • The road to Samarkand

    The city of Samarkand is on the storied Silk Road, but off the beaten path for many tourists. Caroline Eden and Eleanor Ford make the case for the ancient Uzbek city's food and culture in their new book, Samarkand: Recipes & Stories from Central Asia & The Caucasus. They spoke with Lynne Rossetto Kasper about it.

Top Recipes

Breaking Southern food stereotypes with chef Edouardo Jordan of Junebaby

Chef Edouardo Jordan takes Southern food to a new level, highlighting Southern ingredients and tradition at his Seattle restaurant, Junebaby. Host Francis Lam talked with Jordan about his deep research into Southern cooking, and what it means to present Southern cuisine in the opposite corner of the country.