Savory Spiced Pumpkin Soup

Con Poulos

A long time ago on the Caribbean island of St. John, in a little shack of a restaurant surrounded by goats and lapping waves, we had pumpkin soup that tasted like heaven. I’ve had many pumpkin soups since, but none as good as that one. It was slightly spicy and creamy, with a hint of curry. Much better than most pumpkin soups that are too sweet and taste like pie. This is my re-creation of that soup.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
  • 1 white onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
  • 2 pounds pumpkin, peeled, seeded, and chopped
  • 2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream or coconut milk, plus extra for serving
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. In a large soup pot, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes, or until translucent. Add the garlic, turmeric, ginger, curry powder, and parsley and cook, stirring, for 1 minute.

2. Add the pumpkin and stock, bring to a simmer, and cook for 30 minutes, or until the pumpkin has softened completely.

3. In batches, transfer the soup to a blender and process until smooth. Return the soup to the pot and add the lime juice, cream, and salt and pepper to taste. Stir to combine and cook until warmed through. Ladle into bowls and drizzle with a little cream to serve.

Yield: 
Serves 4
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