Mussels Three Ways

Eat Complete

Mussels offer excellent nutrient density at a great value, making them an extremely accessible seafood. Avoid gritty mussels by soaking and rinsing them first, which allows tightly closed mussels to release any residual grit that the careless cook can miss. Because they’re still alive, mussels are some of the freshest seafood in most stores.

1. With Heirloom Tomatoes and Pine Nut Topping

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 onion, minced
  • 4 tomatoes, diced
  • 2 pounds wild or farm-raised raw, tightly closed mussels
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken, vegetable, or beef broth
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts

2. With Garlicky Kale Ribbons and Artichokes

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 onion, minced
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 pounds wild or farm-raised raw, tightly closed mussels
  • 4 large kale leaves, thinly sliced into ribbons
  • 4 artichoke hearts, chopped
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken, vegetable, or beef broth

3. With White Wine and Roasted Red Pepper

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 2 pounds wild or farm-raised raw, tightly closed mussels
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 3/4 cup low-sodium chicken, vegetable, or beef broth
  • 2 cups diced roasted red pepper

Preparing mussels for cooking: Soak the mussels in a large bowl of cold water for 15 to 20 minutes. Using your fingers or a slotted spoon, lift out the mussels and transfer them to a colander. Rinse under cold running water several times and discard any mussels that are damaged or remain open after being firmly squeezed between your thumb and forefinger, or when you firmly tap them.

Check each mussel for a threadlike string hanging out of the shell (called the “beard”). To remove, use a tea towel to grasp the beard, and pull firmly towards the hinge end of the shell and tug free.

Heirloom Tomatoes and Pine Nut Topping: Warm the olive oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the onion begins to brown. Add the tomatoes and cook for 1 minute more until they begin to give off their liquid. Add the mussels and the broth. Cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the mussels open and the meat inside is cooked through. Discard any mussels that have not opened. Sprinkle with the basil and pine nuts and serve immediately.

Garlicky Kale Ribbons and Artichokes: Warm the olive oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the onion begins to brown. Add the mussels, kale, artichokes, and broth. Cover and cook 3 to 4 minutes until the mussels open and the meat inside is cooked through. Discard any mussels that have not opened. Serve immediately.

White Wine and Roasted Red Pepper: Warm the olive oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the onion begins to brown. Add the mussels, wine, and broth. Cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the muscles open and the meat inside is cooked through. Discard any mussels that have not opened. Sprinkle with the roasted red pepper and serve immediately.

Heirloom Tomatoes and Pine Nut Topping Nutritional Stats Per Serving (1/2 Pound Mussels): 358 Calories | 30g Protein | 14g Carbohydrates | 20g Fat (2g Saturated) | 63mg Cholesterol | 3g Sugars | 2g Fiber | 653mg Sodium | Vitamin B  = 1,133% | DHA+EPA = 200% | Selenium = 185% | Protein = 67% | Zinc = 61%

Garlicky Kale Ribbons and Artichokes Nutritional Stats Per Serving (1/2 Pound Mussels): 334 Calories | 33g Protein |  32g Carbohydrates | 9g Fat (2g Saturated) |  63mg Cholesterol | 4g Sugars | 12g Fiber | 750mg Sodium | Vitamin B= 1,125% | Vitamin K = 631% |  DHA+EPA = 200% | Selenium = 187% |  Vitamin C = 147%

White Wine and Roasted Red Pepper Nutritional Stats Per Serving (1/2 Pound Mussels): 266 Calories | 28g Protein |  13g Carbohydrates | 9g Fat (1g Saturated) |  63mg Cholesterol | 2g Sugars | 1g Fiber |  652mg Sodium | Vitamin B = 1,125% | DHA+EPA = 200% | Selenium = 185% | Vitamin C = 77% | Protein = 61%

Tags: 
mussels
Cook time: 
Yield: 
All versions serve 4

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