Stories

Pumpkin pie is going to grandma’s house over that river; it’s a warm fire on a winter night; it’s pure, sweet, spicy comfort in a crust; it’s what bourbon was aged for.
This Thanksgiving Adam Rapoport, editor in chief of Bon Appetit, is taking a stand against pumpkin pie. "I don't want to eat it," he says. "I'm done with pumpkin pie."
Shalon Hastings, a restaurateur from Helena, Montana, challenges Lynne to make a dish from duck fat, whole chicken, tamarind paste, fermented black beans and homemade fig jam.
In the U.S. $162 billion worth of food isn't eaten annually. "An American family of four wastes 1,160 pounds of food a year," says Elizabeth Royte, who wrote "The High Cost of Food Waste" for National Geographic.
This year, other people's problems are your good fortune. Introducing: Turkey Confidential Bingo. We've taken some of the most popular Thanksgiving topics and situations and scrambled them onto a variety of cards you can print.
Actor Stanley Tucci has always cooked. But he says it wasn't until starring in the film Big Night that he "started to take a real, real interest in it." He wrote The Tucci Table with his wife, Felicity Blunt.
Ina Lipkowitz, author of Words To Eat By: Five Foods and the Culinary History of the English Language, says, "Can you imagine if instead of meatloaf we called it fleshloaf? That would sound terrible. What we call food matters."
Jacques Pepin has full master's status as a culinary groundbreaker, a TV star and a consummate teacher. He says when it comes to cooking a hot dog, a lobster roll or a BLT, "There is always a better way of doing it. There is a better way of doing anything."
Chef Vikas Khanna created the Holy Kitchens film series, which focuses on seven different religions. "We don't talk about religion in the films, we just talk about food," he says.
Debra Samuels, author of My Japanese Table: A Lifetime of Cooking with Friends and Family, explains the bento box.
Managing Producer Sally Swift shares three reliable methods for cooking rice: boil it like hell, cook it gently and let it rest, or steam it on a baking sheet.
David Rosengarten of The Rosengarten Report shares three custom coatings for frying seafood.
In the TV series Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution, Jamie Oliver set out to change how the entire city of Huntington, West Virginia, ate. Journalists Jane Black and Brent Cunningham wondered about the show's aftermath.
Jim Gaffigan is a comedian who loves to eat -- except for vegetables. "Generally I'm not a fan," he says. Food figures large in his latest book, Food: A Love Story.
When authorities arrive at Thai Park, an illegal Asian street food market in Berlin, the whole market pretends to be having a picnic. "Just a couple hundred best friends hanging out with their bikes, dogs, kids and food," says independent producer Ryan Kailath.
Andrea Slonecker, author of Pretzel Making at Home, says when it comes to the invention of the pretzel, "we don't know really what's true." She shares the pretzel's origin story and how to make the iconic snack at home.
Amy Thielen, author of The New Midwestern Table and host of Heartland Table, says when it comes to freshwater fish, “the lack of a crust opens up a world of flavor possibilities.”
Dana Cowin, editor in chief of Food & Wine, explains the magazine's top five selections for "Most Innovative Women in Food & Drink."
Chef Margarita Carrillo Arronte, author of Mexico: The Cookbook, explains why in Mexico "men were not welcome in the kitchen many years ago."
A first-rate soup is easy to make with a good stock. But can a stock you buy at the grocery store equal -- or even surpass -- homemade stock?
"It's sort of a funny thing for me to say as a restaurant chef, but my advice to my sons and to everyone is to cook at home at least most of the time," says chef Cal Peternell, author of Twelve Recipes.
Dry your own mushrooms, which will keep for 6-8 months.
Chef Cal Peternell, author of Twelve Recipes, lists three tools you don't need in your kitchen. "There are a few things that just puzzle me," he says.
Rowland Archer from Wake Forest, North Carolina, challenges Lynne to make a dish from fresh blueberries, canned white albacore tuna, leftover cooked angel hair pasta, fresh tomatoes and rind from Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.
Earthy-tasting vegetables like rutabaga and turnips sweeten with roasting, especially if you mix them up with sweet potatoes and onions.