Stories

Chef Daniel Patterson makes a strong case against using tongs in the kitchen. "There is nothing that is better suited to toss a salad than your hands," he says.
"If there's a set of values in Senegal, teranga would be the most important one," says chef Pierre Thiam, author of Senegal. "It's the way you treat the guest."
"My mother taught me that food was fuel," says writer Elissa Altman. "That food was dangerous. That food was the enemy." As Altman's mother grows older, Altman is finding it difficult to get her to eat.
From photographing Mario Batali with a necklace of sausages to Marcus Samuelsson wearing a turban of smoked salmon, Melanie Dunea has an unusual approach to capturing chefs on film.
Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day started as Leanne Brown's thesis project for her master's in food studies at New York University. "$4 a day means something really specific," Brown says.
Cathy Erway, author of The Food of Taiwan, shares the distinctive tastes of Taiwanese cuisine.
"Somebody who wants to learn how to differentiate and appreciate different wines -- they say that anybody can learn how to do that," says Wendy Suzuki, author of Healthy Brain, Happy Life. "You may not become a master sommelier, but you can learn."
For the project "To Live and Dine in L.A.," Josh Kun combed through the Los Angeles Public Library's collection of 9,000 menus dating back to 1875. The resulting book and exhibit show the transformation of the city's restaurant culture.
Darra Goldstein is editor in chief of The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets, an 888-page reference guide to all things sweet.
In Pasta by Hand, Jenn Louis defines dumplings as "handcrafted nubs of dough that are poached, simmered, baked or sauteed." Louis, chef at Lincoln Restaurant in Portland, Oregon, says Italy's dumplings vary by region.
Douglas Quint and his partner, Bryan Petroff, started the Big Gay Ice Cream Truck in 2009. Since then, it has morphed into two stores and a book, Big Gay Ice Cream.
Keith Wilson is the curator of the exhibit "Ancient Chinese Jades and Bronzes" at the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The exhibit includes a variety of Chinese wine vessels from the period between 1200 and 1000 B.C.E. that were used for ceremonial banquets.
A history of confetti from The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets edited by Darra Goldstein.
"The most delicious things that we make are often things that are grown in and around our world," says chef Mario Batali, a champion of eating local. One of the best places to find local produce? A farmers market.
There's a chance you're overwhelmed by some of what's arriving in your CSA boxes. At the very least, you might need some fresh ideas. Here, let us help you with that.
Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are a contentious issue, and Mark Lynas has been on both sides of the debate. He is the author of "How I Got Converted to G.M.O. Food."
Just an hour-and-a-half outside of Rome, Abruzzo is an agricultural breadbasket that doesn't make the itinerary of most tourists to Italy.
Popular since its invention in the early 20th century, commercial baby food was seen as a product of convenience for women. "They were advertised as safe, modern and better than you could prepare at home," says Amy Bentley, author of Inventing Baby Food.
In the 1930s, Fania Lewando ran a popular restaurant in Vilna, Poland, that served vegetarian cuisine to poets and artists, including Marc Chagall. Lewando also wrote a cookbook, which Barbara Mazur discovered in the rare book room at YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.
To experience gelato the way Italians eat it, have it from a tub where it's not frozen solid.
Twenty of our Weeknight Kitchen favorites from the past few years. These are the recipes we have held onto and made our own.
Claudia Roden, author of Arabesque, explains the variations of kofta.
For chef Julia Child, Fourth of July would not be complete without potato salad. She shares how she makes hers.
When it comes to cooking vegetables the Italian way, chef Mario Batali says it's important to seek out products that are local and in season. Plus, you need a really hot pan.
Sally Schneider of Improvised Life shares five ways to make the most out of fresh cherries: iced, cooked, with goat cheese, in ice cream, or as a milk shake.