Warm Goat Cheese Salad

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  • One 11- to 12-ounce log fresh goat cheese, cut crosswise into 4 even pieces
  • 1/2 cup fine dried bread crumbs
  • 1/3 pound thick slice of pancetta, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped shallot
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups frisée greens, washed, dried, and torn into 1-inch pieces

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and a plate with paper towels. Pat the rounds of goat cheese to a scant 1 inch thick. Place the bread crumbs on a plate, then roll each cheese round in the crumbs to coat it on all sides and place on the baking sheet several inches apart.

Place the cheese in the oven and bake until golden and soft, 8 to 10 minutes. While the cheese is baking, heat a skillet over medium heat, add the pancetta pieces, and cook, turning several times, until crisp and brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from the heat and, using a slotted spoon, transfer to the paper towel–lined plate to drain.

In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, vinegar, Dijon mustard, shallot, salt, and pepper. Add the greens and pancetta and toss to coat. Place even amounts of the salad on four individual dinner plates and top with a baked goat cheese round. Serve warm.

Recipe reprinted with permission from Paris to Provence © 2013 by Ethel Brennan and Sara Remington, Andrews McMeel Publishing.

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4 servings
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