Rutabaga Hash with Onions and Crisp Bacon

Antonis Achilleos

Make this hash for a weekend brunch or as an easy weeknight supper. I like to serve it with a tossed green salad or a steamed vegetable and a crusty loaf of bread. Pass Tabasco or other hot sauce at the table; the vinegary, smoky flavor of hot sauce complements the rutabagas, bacon, and chiles. Poach eggs to place on top of this hearty hash. The runny soft-cooked eggs are a perfect accompaniment.

  • 6 slices bacon, about 5 oz/140 g, cut into 3/4-in/2-cm pieces
  • 2 lb/910 g rutabagas, ends trimmed, peeled, and cut into 1/2-in/12-mm dice
  • 1 large yellow onion, cut into 1/2-in/12-mm dice
  • 2 celery ribs, halved lengthwise, then cut crosswise into slices 1/4 in/6 mm thick
  • 1 Anaheim chile, stemmed, seeded, and cut into 1/2-in/12-mm dice
  • 1 jalapeño chile, stemmed, seeded, and minced
  • 1/2 tsp kosher or fine sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 3 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish
  • Tabasco or other hot-pepper sauce for serving

1. In a 12-in/30.5-cm frying pan, preferably cast iron, cook the bacon over medium-high heat until crisp, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain.

2. Pour off all but 1/4 cup/60 ml of the fat from the pan. Return the pan to medium-high heat, add the rutabagas and onion, and sauté, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium, cover, and cook, stirring once, for 7 minutes to steam the rutabagas. Uncover the pan, increase the heat to medium-high, and cook, stirring, until the vegetables are browned at the edges, about 1 minute longer.

3. Add the celery and both chiles, stir briefly, and then cover and cook for 3 minutes longer. Uncover the pan and add the salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until the rutabagas are fork-tender and the celery is crisp but not raw tasting. Fold in the cilantro and bacon. Serve immediately, garnished with additional cilantro. Pass the hot-pepper sauce at the table.

Diane Morgan, Roots: The Definitive Compendium with More than 225 Recipes, Chronicle Books (2012)

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4 to 6 servings
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