Roman Mustard

Photo courtesy Los Angeles Times

Note: Adapted from The Mustard Book by Rosamond Man and Robin Weir.

Ingredients

  • About 3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon (5 ounces) brown mustard seed
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened red grape juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons very coarse salt, such as Maldon
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds, finely ground
  • 1/4 cup (1 ounce) flaked almonds
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon (1½ ounces) untoasted pine nuts
Instructions

1. Soak the mustard seeds: Place the mustard seeds in a medium glass or ceramic bowl along with the vinegar and grape juice. Mix in the salt and cumin seeds. Set aside, covered (but not sealed airtight), for 36 to 48 hours.

2. Place the mixture in a food processor and process for 1 to 2 minutes until the seeds are coarsely ground. Add the almonds and pine nuts and pulse a few times just until the nuts are completely broken up, careful not to over-process. This makes about 2 1/2 cups mustard.

Each tablespoon: 33 calories; 1 gram protein; 2 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram fiber; 2 grams fat; 0 saturated fat; 0 cholesterol; 1 gram sugar; 57 mg sodium.

Reprinted from The L.A. Times by Noelle Carter. Reprinted with permission.

Categories: 
Condiments/Chutneys
Prep time: 
15 minutes active, plus 1 1/2- 2 days soaking time for the mustard seeds
Total time: 
15 minutes active
Yield: 
2 1/2 cups mustard
  • Is the ability to cook what made us human?

    Richard Wrangham, a professor at Harvard University and author of Catching Fire, studies the role of cooking in human evolution. "Once you start thinking about the importance of cooking -- its supply of energy, its strange distribution compared to natural foods -- it's bound to have affected our evolution hugely, our behavior, our society, our cognition, all sorts of features about us," he says.

Top Recipes

Lambic beer: Your comprehensive guide

Greg Engert, beer director for the Neighborhood Restaurant Group in Washington, D.C., explains how how lambic beer is produced.