Potato Chip and Chicken Liver

Rene Redzepi: A Work in Progress
Ingredients

Potato discs:
  • 1 baking potato, peeled
  • grapeseed oil
  • salt
Chicken liver mousse:
  • 450g chicken livers
  • grapeseed oil
  • 5g lemon thyme leaves, plus extra
  • 85g apple balsamic vinegar, plus extra
  • 12 verbena leaves, plus extra
  • 10 dried black trumpet mushrooms
  • 175g butter
  • salt
  • 20g crème fraiche
Black trumpet mushroom powder
  • 100g dried black trumpet mushrooms
Instructions

Potato discs

Cut the potato into thin long threads on a Japanese turning vegetable slicer. Soak the threads to remove the starch. Dry and weigh into 5g portions. Put four 5.3cm ring moulds into the base of a large pan. Add oil and heat to 145°C (290°F). Place a portion of potato into each ring mould and deep-fry to create crispy discs. Repeat. Keep on wax paper. Season with salt.

Chicken liver mousse

Wipe the chicken livers. Heat a little oil and sauté the chicken livers on both sides, until cooked but still pink inside. Sprinkle with lemon thyme leaves. Deglaze with a little apple balsamic vinegar and transfer the livers onto a tray to cool. Blend the livers with the verbena leaves, dried black trumpet mushrooms and butter until smooth. Pass, then season the mouse with salt and apple balsamic vinegar. Chop a few verbena and lemon thyme leaves and mix with the crème fraiche and 100g of the mousse. Season with salt and apple balsamic vinegar. Transfer to a pastry bag and keep at room temperature.

Black trumpet mushroom powder

Blend the dried mushrooms to a fine powder and strain. Keep in an airtight container.

Serving

Pipe a little chicken liver mousse along the edge of 4 crispy potato discs. Place a second disc on top. Sprinkle with black trumpet powder and serve.
Adapted from Rene Redzepi: A Work in Progress by Rene Redzepi, Phaidon Press, 2013. 
Categories: 
Main DishesSides
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