Greek Garlic Sauce

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This thick Greek garlic sauce makes a marvelous dip to be served with vegetables as an accompaniment to fish or chicken. Avoid using a food processor or an electric mixer, which can make potatoes gluey.

  • 2 large russet potatoes, peeled and cut into small (1/2-to-1/4-inch) cubes
  • 6 plump garlic cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 large egg yolk (optional, but makes a firmer dip)
  • 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more if needed
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • Freshly ground white pepper

Pita bread, celery, carrot, bell pepper, and fennel sticks for dipping

Cover potatoes with water in a 3-quart saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer until potatoes are tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain, rinse with cold water and process through a ricer or mash thoroughly.

Meanwhile, put garlic and salt in a large wooden bowl and pound with a pestle until thoroughly mashed. Gradually add potatoes and pound them with garlic. If mixture is still hot, let cool 15 minutes, then add egg yolk, if using, and vigorously mash or beat in with a wooden spoon. Alternating olive oil with lemon juice and vinegar, gradually add both to potato mixture, vigorously mashing or beating. Using a fork, add pepper, mixing briskly until very smooth. Mix in more olive oil, or even some water, a little at a time, if sauce is too thick to use as a dip.

Spoon into a container and store, covered, in refrigerator. It will keep for about 1 week. Bring to room temperature several hours before serving. Spoon into a bowl and serve with fresh vegetables and pita for dipping.

Tags: 
garlic
Yield: 
Serves 8 to 12
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