Fattoush

The Feast Goes On
I first tasted this wonderfully fresh salad years ago in a Lebanese restaurant and then recreated my own version. It's a winner for me, as anything with pomegranates or pomegranate molasses makes my mouth water. And it's a lovely change from all the cakes that I have come to know so intimately over the decades.

Fattoush
 
  • 2 slices mountain or pita bread
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1/4 iceberg (crisphead) lettuce, shredded
  • 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
  • 3 radishes, very finely sliced
  • 5 French shallots, finely sliced
  • 2 Lebanese (short) cucumbers, halved lengthways and finely sliced
  • 1 large handful flat-leaf (Italian) parsley leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1 handful mint leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 teaspoons sumac
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Extra 1/2 teaspoon sumac, for serving
Dressing
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup) olive oil
  • 80 ml (1/3 cup) lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon pomegranate molasses
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
Preheat the oven to 170°C (325°F/Gas 3).

Using a pastry brush, paint the bread with the olive oil, place on a baking tray and bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Allow to cool, then break into pieces.

To make the dressing, combine all ingredients in a bowl or shake in a jar. Place all the prepared vegetables and herbs in a salad bowl. Sprinkle with the sumac and enough of the dressing to coat the leaves. Mix well. Add the bread and gently toss. Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper if needed. Sprinkle with the extra sumac to serve.

From The Feast Goes On by Monday Morning Cooking Club, HarperCollins 2014.

Yield: 
Serves 8
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