Chicken Stock

Hemera

It takes very little work to make your own stock; mostly it is a matter of being at home for the several hours it takes to cook. A flavorful money saver that is practically fat- and salt-free, homemade stock can be frozen in small quantities and used as needed.

Chicken backs and necks are available at most supermarkets. If you don't see them, ask the butcher to set aside some for you. I also make stock from the bones of roasted chicken or turkey.

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds chicken bones (necks, backs, wings, etc.), skinless or with as little skin as possible
  • 6 quarts cold water
  • 1 large onion (about 8 ounces), quartered
  • 1 tablespoon herbes de Provence
  • 12 whole cloves
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce (optional)

Instructions

  • Combine the bones and water in a large stockpot and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and boil gently for 30 minutes. Most of the fat and impurities will rise to the surface; skim off as much of them as you can and discard them.
  • Add the onion, herbes de Provence, cloves, bay leaves, and soy sauce, if using, return to a boil, and boil gently for 2 1/2 hours. Strain the stock through a fine strainer or a colander lined with dampened paper towels. Allow to cool.
  • Remove the surface fat and refrigerate the stock for up to 5 days, or pour into containers and freeze.

Excerpted from Essential Pépin, © 2011 by Jacques Pépin. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. 

Categories: 
Soups/StewsDIY
Prep time: 
10 min
Cook time: 
3 hours
Total time: 
3 hours and 10 min
Yield: 
3 quarts
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