Chicken Stock

Hemera

It takes very little work to make your own stock; mostly it is a matter of being at home for the several hours it takes to cook. A flavorful money saver that is practically fat- and salt-free, homemade stock can be frozen in small quantities and used as needed.

Chicken backs and necks are available at most supermarkets. If you don't see them, ask the butcher to set aside some for you. I also make stock from the bones of roasted chicken or turkey.

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds chicken bones (necks, backs, wings, etc.), skinless or with as little skin as possible
  • 6 quarts cold water
  • 1 large onion (about 8 ounces), quartered
  • 1 tablespoon herbes de Provence
  • 12 whole cloves
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce (optional)

Instructions

  • Combine the bones and water in a large stockpot and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and boil gently for 30 minutes. Most of the fat and impurities will rise to the surface; skim off as much of them as you can and discard them.
  • Add the onion, herbes de Provence, cloves, bay leaves, and soy sauce, if using, return to a boil, and boil gently for 2 1/2 hours. Strain the stock through a fine strainer or a colander lined with dampened paper towels. Allow to cool.
  • Remove the surface fat and refrigerate the stock for up to 5 days, or pour into containers and freeze.

Excerpted from Essential Pépin, © 2011 by Jacques Pépin. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. 

Categories: 
Soups/StewsDIY
Prep time: 
10 min
Cook time: 
3 hours
Total time: 
3 hours and 10 min
Yield: 
3 quarts
  • David Sedaris on his father: 'He would eat in his underpants'

    With more than 7 million copies of his books in print, humorist and satirist David Sedaris looks at the sides of life that most of us would not even notice. The author of Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls explains why his father would dine in underpants.

Top Recipes

Regional food is more than hamburgers and hotdogs; it's 'a national legacy'

Roadfood, by Jane and Michael Stern, was published in 1977 and became a classic that is now in its ninth edition. Michael says regional food is "a national legacy, a heritage that's well worth preserving."