Beer and Caraway Mustard

Photo courtesy Los Angeles Times
Note: To toast caraway seeds, place them in a small skillet. Heat the skillet over medium heat, just until the seeds become aromatic, 1 to 2 minutes, shaking the pan occasionally to keep the seeds from burning.

Ingredients
  • About 1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons (2 1/2 ounces) brown mustard seeds
  • About 3/4 cup (2 1/2 ounces) mustard powder
  • 1 tablespoon toasted and crushed caraway seeds
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3/4 cup flat beer, preferably stout or a dark ale
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Instructions

1. Soak the mustard seeds: Place the mustard seeds, powder and crushed caraway seeds in a medium glass or ceramic bowl along with the water and beer. Set aside, covered (but not sealed airtight), for 24 hours.

2. Place the mixture in a food processor along with the salt, sugar and Worcestershire sauce. Process for 1 to 2 minutes until the seeds are coarsely ground. This makes about 12/3 cups mustard.

3. The mustard will be very pungent at first. Cover and refrigerate for at least one week before using, to allow the flavors to mellow and marry.

Each tablespoon: 36 calories; 2 grams protein; 3 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram fiber; 2 grams fat; 0 saturated fat; 0 cholesterol; 1 gram sugar; 68 mg sodium.

Reprinted from The L.A. Times by Noelle Carter. Reprinted with permission.

Prep time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 
1 2/3 cups mustard
  • Questions about Korean food? Let Robin Ha draw you a picture.

    You're not likely to find a more visually creative cookbook than Robin Ha's Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes, in which she illustrates the recipes for her favorite Korean dishes. She tells Lynne Rossetto Kasper about the role comics play in her culture, the seven key ingredients in Korean food, and the "magic" of gochujang.

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