Angel Hair Pasta with Fennel and Spicy Tomatoes

Mette Nielsen

The smaller fennel bulbs at our farmers markets tend to have a more pronounced licorice flavor that pairs nicely with the tang of good tomatoes.

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 large fennel bulb, chopped
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons chopped thyme
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds, crushed
  • Generous pinch of crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 6 to 8 medium plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped, or one 28-ounce can diced tomatoes with their liquid
  • 1 pound angel hair pasta
  • 1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped basil

Cook the pasta in a large pot of lightly salted boiling water until it's tender but still firm.

Serve the sauce over the pasta, and sprinkle with Parmesan, parsley, and basil.

Heat the oil in a large, deep skillet over medium heat, and add the onion, fennel, garlic, thyme, fennel seeds, and crushed red pepper. Cook, stirring, until the onion is translucent, about 8 to 10 minutes. Stir in the white wine and the tomatoes, reduce the heat, and simmer until the tomatoes are very soft and the liquid is reduced by about half. If the sauce begins to look dry, add a little of the pasta cooking water. Season the sauce with salt and pepper.

Reprinted from Minnesota's Bounty: The Farmers Market Cookbook by Beth Dooley. Copyright © 2013 University of Minnesota Press.

Yield: 
Serves 4 to 6
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