All Things Teriyaki

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May 14th, 2011

This week historian John T Edge tells us about his on-going reporting for the New York Times called United Tastes, Jane and Michael Stern have found the ultimate hangover cure in New Orleans, a dish called Ya-Ka Mein. We meet a PHD candidate studying "coziness" and we get a take on the 5 Stages of Grief—"pea" grief that it is, from Emily Franklin, author of Too Many Cooks.

Jane and Michael Stern's Roadfood

For those of us who arrive skeptical about the flavor potential of boiled fish, not to mention vastly oversalted boiled fish, this true-Wisconsin meal is stunning. The thick hunks of whitefish remind us of lobster: milk-moist, dense and fine-textured. Incredibly, their elusive freshwater sweetness is just barely haloed by the presence of salt.

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Ya-Ka Mein is not a restaurant, but a dish most frequently found at food counters, or street vendors. It's a true fusion dish of stew, noodles, broth, and a hardboiled egg, that is then garnished with green onions.