Yield
serves 4

Krautfleckerl

This wintry, satisfying dish can be made with store-bought fresh egg noodles or, if you have time, you can make your own. Regardless of which direction you go, remember to pull the noodles out of the pasta water slightly before they are done and transfer them into the pot with the onions and cabbage. This will ensure they absorb as much flavor as possible as they finish cooking. Krautfleckerl makes for an excellent side for sausages like Spicy Hungarian-Style Bratwurst or Smoked Pork and Bacon Sausage, though it’s hearty enough to stand alone also as a vegetarian main course.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 1/2 cup/110 g unsalted butter 
  • 1 yellow onion, diced 
  • 1/2 head Savoy cabbage, cored and cut into 1-in/2.5-cm squares
  • 1 1/2 tbsp sugar 
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh marjoram, or 1 tsp dried marjoram 
  • Kosher salt
  • 12 oz/340 g fresh semolina egg noodles, homemade (see separate recipe) or store-bought 
  • Freshly ground black pepper

1. In a medium Dutch oven, heat the canola oil and butter over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Add the cabbage, sugar, marjoram, and 1 1/2 tsp salt and stir to combine. Turn the heat to low and cook until the cabbage is soft, about 20 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, fill a large pot three-fourths full with water, season the water with enough salt to make it almost as salty as seawater, and bring to a boil over high heat. Drop in the noodles, stir to prevent them from sticking together, and cook until almost tender, 3 to 4 minutes. (They will cook more with the cabbage mixture.)

3. Drain the noodles, add them to the cabbage mixture, and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until heated through and the noodles have absorbed some flavor from the cabbage mixture, about 6 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and serve immediately.

Semolina Egg Noodles (Griessbandnudeln)

makes about 1 1/4 lb/565 g noodles

Your standard-issue wide egg noodle, Griessbandnudeln is eaten throughout Germany. Here, the typical semolina dough is cut into broad diamonds rather than ribbons. Serve the noodles simply tossed with butter and herbs, or toss them with a gravy or the sauce from a braise.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups/500 g semolina flour, plus more for dusting
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup/120 ml water 
  • 1 tbsp grapeseed or canola oil, plus more as needed if reserving the noodles
  • Kosher salt

1. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, eggs, water, and grapeseed oil and mix on low speed for 1 minute. Increase the speed to medium and mix until the dough comes together, 2 to 3 minutes. Increase the mixer speed by one setting and continue mixing until all of the ingredients are thoroughly combined and a tight dough ball forms, about 5 minutes. (If the dough feels too dry, add an additional 1 tbsp water.)

2. Remove the dough from the bowl, wrap in plastic wrap, and let sit at room temperature for 1 hour. (The dough can also be wrapped and refrigerated overnight; bring to room temperature before continuing.)

3. Lightly flour a work surface. Unwrap the dough and cut it into four equal portions. Place one portion on the floured work surface and roll out to 1/4 in/6 mm thick. (Alternatively, following the manufacturer’s instructions, roll out the dough on a pasta machine.) Using a pizza cutter or a knife, cut the dough sheet into diamond shapes about 1 in/2.5 cm long. Transfer the diamonds to a sheet pan and dust lightly with all-purpose flour. Repeat with the remaining dough portions.

4. Fill a large pot three-fourths full with water, season the water with enough salt to make it almost as salty as seawater, and bring to a boil over high heat. Drop in the noodles, stir to prevent them from sticking together, and cook until tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain the noodles and serve as desired, or toss with a little oil and reserve until needed.

Jeremy and Jessica Nolen with Drew Lazor, New German Cooking: Recipes for Classic Revisited, Chronicle Books (2014)