Grilled Greens, Chickpea, and Peppadew Sandwich

Eat Your Vegetables

This is a gooey, cheesy sandwich, a marriage of garlic-spiked chickpeas and already braised greens—and with a little punch of something extra. For those of you who are saying, “What the heck are Peppadews?” I’m so glad you asked, because it gives me a chance to spread the word. This brand of jarred sweet-and-sour-and-a-touch-spicy miniature peppers from South Africa is one of my favorite ways to add oomph to a sandwich. Chop or blend them up into the mayo or mustard or, in this case, just add them to the layers. They also make a great addition to a cheese plate or pickle tray. Look for them near the olives and pickles in supermarkets; some markets sell them by weight in olive bars.

  • 1/3 cup cooked chickpeas, preferably homemade, rinsed if canned, drained
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 slices multigrain sandwich bread
  • 1/4 cup shredded or chopped fontina
  • 1/3 cup cooked greens, drained
  • 3 Peppadews, drained and chopped

In a small bowl, combine the chickpeas, garlic, and 2 teaspoons of the olive oil. Lightly smash the chickpeas with a fork, leaving the mixture chunky. Taste and season generously with salt and several grinds of black pepper.

Put a medium skillet over medium heat. Brush one side of each piece of bread with the remaining teaspoon of olive oil. Put one piece oiled side down on your work surface, and top with half the cheese, followed by the greens, the chickpea mixture, the Peppadews, and the remaining half of the cheese. Top with the other piece of bread, with the oiled side facing out. Press lightly with your palm to slightly compress the sandwich.

Transfer the sandwich to the skillet and cook it until the cheese has melted and the bread is lightly browned and crisp. Transfer it to a plate, cut in half, and eat.

Tags: 
chickpeas
  • When it comes to cooking sausage, it's all about heat management

    "If you're going to grill, you can mark it first on a hotter part of the grill," says Chris Ying, editor in chief of Lucky Peach and co-author of The Wurst of Lucky Peach. "Then move it to the cooler, indirect heat to finish cooking gently and slowly, and let all of those fats and everything break down inside of the sausage."

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Host Francis Lam wins multiple 2017 James Beard Media Awards

Host Francis Lam won several awards at the 2017 James Beard Foundation Media Awards for his work as food writer and cookbook editor.