Tamarind-Glazed Pork Tenderloin Sauté

Ingredients

© 2004 Lynne Rossetto Kasper

Serves 4 to 6

If possible, marinate pork overnight. Serve with green beans, Basmati rice and sweet onion salad.

Marinade:

  • 3 tablespoons canola or extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 to 3 generous tablespoons tamarind concentrate
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/4 cup dry wine
  • 6 large cloves garlic
  • 2 teaspoons Thai fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon medium or hot chile powder

Meat and Pan Sauce:

  • 2 pork tenderloins, trimmed of connective tissue and fat
  • 2 tablespoons canola or extra-virgin olive oil
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/3 cup dry wine

1. Puree marinade ingredients in food processor. Pour into a heavy plastic bag, add pork, work to coat with marinade, seal and refrigerate 2 to 24 hours.

2. To cook, heat the 2 tablespoons oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium high. Lift meat from bag and pat dry. Slowly brown pork on all sides. Sprinkle with a little salt and a generous amount of pepper.

3. Turn heat to medium low and continue cooking, turning often, 15 minutes, or until an instant reading thermometer in the center of the tenderloin reads 145°. As pork cooks, if pan juices threaten to burn add a little water and scrape them up.

4. Remove pork to a serving platter and let rest. Add remaining marinade from the bag, along with the second quantity of wine. Bring to a boil, stirring with a spatula. Cook 2 minutes, or until thick, reduced and delicious. Pour over pork and serve.

Instructions

Categories: 
Main Dishes
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 
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