Stir Fried Ginger Shrimp

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These are wonderfully messy shrimp that were meant to be eaten with fingers, chopsticks or forks. Since this stir fry is so good cold on a salad of mixed greens, I've provided for leftovers in the recipe.

Allow 30 minutes to an hour for marinating and 3 to 4 minutes for stir-frying. Eat the shrimp hot from the pan or warm. To protect from any kind of spoilage, don't let them stand at room temperature more than about 20 minutes.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons rice wine, or dry sherry
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese toasted sesame seed oil
  • 1 packed teaspoon dark brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons rice or cider vinegar
  • 2-inch piece of fresh ginger root, peeled and minced
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 1 pound raw jumbo shrimp, shelled with tail section left intact
  • 3 tablespoons cold-pressed vegetable or seed oil (safflower, canola or peanut)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large whole scallion, thinly sliced

Instructions

  • 1. Thirty minutes to an hour before cooking, combine the soy, wine, sesame oil, sugar, vinegar, ginger, and garlic in a medium bowl. Toss with the shrimp, cover and refrigerate.
  • 2. Remove from the fridge, and remove the shrimp from the marinade, scraping it off them and saving it in the bowl. Pat the shrimp dry with a paper towel.
  • 3. Heat the oil in a wok or large sauté pan over high heat. Drop in the shrimp, quickly sprinkle with a little salt and a generous amount of pepper. Stir fry about 3 minutes, or until they turn pink and are barely firm.
  • 4. Scrape the marinade and scallions into the pan. Continue stir-frying another minute, or until shrimp are just firm, but not hard and rubbery. Immediately turn into a serving bowl. Serve hot or warm.
Tags: 
canola oil
Prep time: 
10 min plus time to marinade
Cook time: 
15 min
Total time: 
25 min
Yield: 
2 servings

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