A Simple Tomato Sauce

This sauce completes our Meatballs and Spaghetti for Romance

Ingredients
  • Good tasting extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium to large onion, cut into quarter-inch dice
  • Salt and freshly-ground black pepper
  • 3 large garlic cloves, minced
  • tightly-packed 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, torn
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/3 cup dry white or red wine
  • 1 28-oz. can whole tomatoes with their juice (I like Muir Glen or Hunts)
  • 1 14-oz can whole tomatoes with their juice
Instructions

1. Film the bottom of a 12-inch, straight-sided saute pan with olive oil and heat over medium-high heat.

2. Stir in the onions and a generous sprinkling of salt and pepper. Saute the onions until they are golden brown (about 5 minutes).

3. Turn the heat down to medium. Add the garlic, basil, tomato paste and wine and stir, scraping up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer until the wine completely evaporates. Do not let the mixture burn.

4. Stir in both cans of tomatoes and their juice, breaking them up with your hands as you add them. Raise the heat to medium high and simmer the sauce, uncovered, for 8 minutes, or until thick. Stir occasionally to keep it from sticking. Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary.

[Disclosure: This recipe was created at a time when The Splendid Table had no business relationship with any canned tomato company. In July 2014, we were thrilled to welcome Muir Glen as an underwriter of our program.]

Copyright © 2012 Lynne Rossetto Kasper

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