Three kinds of chocolate—semisweet chocolate, white chocolate, and cocoa powder—ensure a serious chocolate flavor that’s balanced by the tart bite of dried cherries.

They get their captivating flavor from the tiny black nigella seeds sprinkled liberally over the top.

Place the pumpkin and eschalots on a baking tray lined with non-stick baking paper and drizzle with the oil. Roast for 25 minutes, add the chorizo, tomato and marjoram to the tray and roast for a further 15 minutes or until the pumpkin is soft and the chorizo is golden and crisp.

Place the stock, sage, thyme, oregano and garlic in a deep saucepan over high heat and bring to the boil. Add the cauliflower, reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 8–10 minutes or until tender.

Place the onions, cut-side up, in a greased baking dish. Drizzle with the oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 1 1/2 hours. Uncover and bake for a further 15 minutes or until just starting to brown.

A blend of nutritional yeast, cardamom, smoked paprika, and turmeric at the ready go a long way toward keeping your snack life spicy.

I have one back-pocket recipe that can save any breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Popovers.

My favorite thing to do with a winter squash is to stuff it.

Bursting with fresh herbs, lemon, and mango, and super easy to throw together, this healthy grain salad would make a great addition to picnics or potlucks.


Top Recipes

Making food that is Japanese at its core, in America

Daisuke Utagawa, co-owner of Sushiko, says he tries to instill the philosophy of Japanese cuisine into ingredients available in the U.S.