Peaches Roasted in Amaretto

Gentl and Hyers
Ingredients:

  • 4 peaches
  • 1/4 cup amaretto
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • Crème fraîche or Fior di Latte Gelato, for serving
Directions:

1. Preheat the broiler to high.

2. Halve the peaches and remove and discard the pits.

3. Place the peach halves in a skillet that will hold them in a single layer. Pour the amaretto over the peaches and sprinkle with the sugar. Place the skillet on the stovetop over high heat to burn off the alcohol, about 3 minutes. Pay attention when the amaretto cooks off its alcohol, taking care not to burn the mixture. Transfer the pan to the broiler and broil until the peaches are browned and the liquid has reduced to a honeylike consistency, 5 to 10 minutes. Serve the peaches hot, warm, at room temperature, or even cold. These are just perfect by themselves or with a bit of creme fraiche or Fior di Latte Gelato.

Digestifs

A glass of cognac, Calvados, or Armagnac is very nice following a meal. Known as digestifs, the liquors contribute to what I consider the art of the digestif, which is the ritual following dinner that marries gastronomy and conviviality, and aids digestion. I like to drop off a tray of cognac and glasses at the table and let my guests help themselves. Arcane etiquette: digestifs are always passed to the left and poured by oneself.

Excerpted from the book Buvette by Jody Williams. © 2014 by Jody Williams. Reprinted by permission of Grand Central Publishing. All rights reserved.

Yield: 
Serves 4
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