New Potato Salad

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This could be the lightest, freshest tasting potato salad of the summer. At the farmers’ market, look for newly dug potatoes, which are usually the sweetest tasting ones. You want “boiling potatoes” (as opposed to bakers) with names like Yellow Finn, German Fingerling, Rose Finn Apple, Ruby Crescent, Butterfinger, White Rose, Desiree, Red Norland or Red Bliss.


  • 2 to 3 pounds potatoes (see above), unpeeled
  • 1/2 medium onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 4 to 5 tablespoons cider vinegar or white wine vinegar, more as needed
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons coarse, dark mustard
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup snipped fresh dill leaves
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise, or to taste


1. Scrub the potatoes and simmer in water to cover until barely tender when pierced with a knife. Let simmer another 1 minute and drain. Run cold water over them for just a minute, drain and peel while warm. Cut into bite-sized pieces.

2. While the potatoes cook, stir together in a large serving bowl the onion, garlic, vinegar, sugar, salt, and pepper. Let stand until the potatoes are ready. Once they are cut and still warm, gently fold them into the vinegar mixture and let stand 30 minutes. Fold in the mustard, oil, dill, and mayonnaise. Chill.

3. Taste for tartness and seasoning just before serving. Garnish with fresh dill sprigs.

Keeps several days in the refrigerator.

From A Summertime Grilling Guide by Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift. Copyright © 2012 by American Public Media.

Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
4 to 6 cups; doubles easily
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