Limoncello

Gifts from the Kitchen

This after-dinner drink is like a little ray of boozy citrus sunshine at the end of a heavy meal and should be served very cold, in little shot glasses. If you’re lucky enough to find some lemons with stems and leaves attached, these would make a very beautiful label or gift tag.


Ingredients
 
  • 6 organic lemons
  • 1 1/4 cups superfine sugar
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 25-fl oz (750ml) bottle of good-quality vodka
Instructions

Wash and dry the lemons and remove the zest in fine strips, using a vegetable peeler. Squeeze the juice from the lemons and set aside.

Pour 1/3 cup of water into a small pan, add the zest and sugar, and slowly bring to a boil, stirring occasionally until the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer very gently for 15 minutes. Add the lemon juice and simmer for another 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

Pour the vodka into a large sterilized preserving jar and add the lemony syrup. Secure the lid and shake well. Set aside in a cool, dry, dark place for a week, shaking the jar every day. Strain off the lemon zest and decant the limoncello into a pretty bottle.

Recipe from Gifts from the Kitchen: 100 Irresistible Homemade Presents for Every Occasion by Annie Rigg (Kyle Books, 2011). Recipe reprinted with permission.

Tags: 
lemonvodka
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 
1 25-oz bottle
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