Lime Nut Buttons

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Ingredients
  • 4-1/2 ounces (1 cup) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon table salt
  • 1/2 cup confectioners sugar; more for coating
  • 1/3 cup coarsely chopped pecans
  • 1/4 cup sweetened flaked coconut
  • 4 ounces (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lime zest
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Instructions

Several hours before baking: In a small bowl, combine the flour and salt. In a food processor, combine the 1/2 cup confectioners sugar, the pecans, and the coconut. Process until the pecans are finely ground. With an electric mixer, beat the butter until creamy. Add the pecan mixture and beat until well blended. Beat in the lime zest and vanilla. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and add the flour mixture, beating just until combined. Remove the dough from the bowl, wrap in plastic, and chill until firm, about 3 hours.

To bake: Heat the oven to 350°F. Measure the dough into heaping teaspoon-size pieces and roll each piece between your palms to form a ball. Put the balls 1 1/2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets; bake until the edges of the cookies barely begin to brown, 12 to 14 minutes. Let cool on the sheets for 3 to 4 minutes and then roll in confectioners sugar while still very warm. Repeat rolling to create a delicate powdery coating.

Adapted from Fine Cooking magazine's "Holiday Baking" issue, December 2002. Used with permission.

Categories: 
DessertsCookies
Prep time: 
15 minutes, plus chill time
Cook time: 
12-15 minutes
Total time: 
About 30 minutes
Yield: 
About 30 1 1/2 inch cookies

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