Liberace's Sticky Buns

Ingredients
 
  • 1 cup white raisins
  • 1/4 cup light rum
  • 1 1/2 cups brown sugar
  • 2 sticks unsalted butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
  • 3 packages refrigerated unbaked crescent rolls
  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 1 cup whole pecans
  • Non-stick baking spray with flour for greasing pan
Instructions

Preheat oven to 325°. Spray two muffin pans with non-stick baking spray. Combine raisins and rum in a small bowl and warm in microwave on high for 45 seconds. Set aside. In a saucepan, melt butter and then stir in spices and brown sugar. Cook, stirring frequently, until it becomes a bubbling syrup. Put a teaspoon of syrup and a few whole pecans in each muffin cup.

Unroll one package of crescent rolls on a piece of parchment paper. Pinch seams together to form one flat piece. Drizzle a quarter of the syrup over the dough. Sprinkle a third of the raisins and a third of the chopped pecans on it. Roll it jelly roll style. Cut into 1-inch thick pieces. Place one slice of dough, cut side up, in each muffin tin. Repeat with each package of crescent rolls. Bake 13-15 minutes or until golden brown.

Remove from oven and immediately flip the buns onto a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper. Replace any nuts that may have stuck to the pan and serve warm.
Categories: 
Breakfast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 
12 servings
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