Hot and Sweet Onion Confit

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An improvised recipe for our Stump the Cook contest that is eaten at room temperature. For appetizers and snacks, pile the onions on garlic toast or cucumber slices. For main dishes, try it over grilled salmon, sword fish, or lamb, or over cous cous, quinoa, or rice.

  • 8 dried prunes, pitted and coarsely chopped
  • water or club soda
  • Fruity extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 to 4 medium onions, sliced into 1/4 inch-thick rings
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons drained capers
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoons horseradish
Soak prunes in water while preparing other ingredients. Lightly film the bottom of a 12-inch saute pan with oil. Heat over high and add onions, salt and pepper. Saute fast until onions start to color but are still crisp.

Lower heat to medium low, stir in garlic and drained prunes and cook about 3 minutes. Off the heat, blend in capers and horse radish to taste. Sample for seasoning. Serve at room temperature.

© 1997 Lynne Rossetto Kasper, All Rights Reserved

Yield: 
Serves 4 to 8
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