Gloria's Black Bean Soup

This recipe is part of a Cuban-Style ChristmasMojitoGarlic Plantain ChipsLime, Garlic, and Oregano MojoAvocado SaladGloria's Black Bean SoupCrab Empanadas with Pickled Garlic-Caper Remoulade and Roasted Pork Marinade.

  • 1 pound of dried black beans
  • 3 quarts water
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 large red peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 2 shallots, chopped
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano leaves
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 1 red onion, dried for garnish
  • 8 ounces sour cream, for garnish (optional)

1. Place the beans in a nonreactive pan. Cover with three quarts water, add the bay leaves and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer the beans for 2 1/2 to 3 hours, stirring frequently and adding more water if neccessary to keep them covered.

2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a sauté pan or skillet. Saute the the bell peppers, shallots, and onions over medium heat until the onions are translucent, about 15 minutes.

3. Add the garlic, cumin, dried and fresh oregano and saute for an additional 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth.

4. When the beans are almost tender, add the pureed mixture, sugar, and salt to the beans and cook until just tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Adjust the seasonings, garnish with the red onion and sour cream, and serve

Yield: 
8-10 servings
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