Ginger-Sesame Seed Coleslaw

Jennifer Simonson
This is one gorgeous salad: Slivered red and white cabbage tossed with ginger, garlic and orange peel -- pure Asian flavors finished off with white and black sesame seeds. 

For the fresh crunch you want to set off those tender Spice-Crusted Oven Spareribs, toss the cabbage with the dressing at the last minute. 

Cook to Cook: This recipe is a perfect excuse to head to your local Asian market and pick up pantry essentials at bargain prices. 

Dressing can be made 1 day ahead and held covered in the refrigerator until ready to use.  

The Dressing:
  • 1 heaping tablespoon finely chopped ginger 
  • 2 large cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce 
  • 2 tablespoons unseasoned rice wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon hot chili oil (optional) 
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil 
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 
  • Grated zest of one large orange 
  • Juice of 1/2 orange, freshly squeezed, about 2 tablespoons 
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
The Slaw:
  • 2 tablespoons black sesame seeds 
  • 2 tablespoons white sesame seeds 
  • 1/2 medium head of Napa cabbage, trimmed, cored and cut into thin slivers, about 4 cups 
  • 1/2 medium head of red cabbage, trimmed, cored and cut into thin slivers, about 4 cups
  • 3-4 scallions, white and light green parts, finely chopped 
1. To make the dressing, combine the ginger, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, hot chili oil, sesame oil, olive oil, orange zest, orange juice and sugar in a medium-size bowl. Set aside. If making ahead, store covered in the refrigerator until ready to use. 

2. To make the slaw, place all the sesame seeds in a small, heavy skillet over medium heat. Toast, stirring often, until just fragrant, about 30 seconds. Scrape from the hot pan into a small bowl and set aside. 

3. In a large serving bowl, combine the Napa cabbage, red cabbage, scallions, sesame seeds, and dressing and toss until well combined. 
 

Coleslaw
(Photo: Jennifer Simonson)

Prep time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 
Serves 4 to 6 as a side dish
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