Dutch Oven Benedict

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Ingredients
  • 1 (16.3-ounce) can biscuits (we prefer Pillsbury)
  • 8 large eggs
  • 6 slices (3 ounces) prosciutto, and/or 6 slices (3 ounces) pancetta
  • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
  • Salt and black pepper
Instructions

1. Spray your Dutch oven insert with cooking spray, then place your separated biscuits on the bottom. Press your thumb in the middle of the biscuit to create a biscuit cup, if you would. Crack an egg in each biscuit cup, then place some prosciutto and/or pancetta across the egg. Spread a healthy portion of Parmesan cheese across the whole thing. This will create the cheese sauce that will hold everything together, kind of like glue. Season with salt and pepper.

2. Place the insert into the Dutch oven, making sure there is separation between the bottom of the Dutch oven and the biscuits. We like to take an unused aluminum pie tin turned upside down and place it under the insert to create a more indirect heat from the hot coals. Cover the Dutch oven and place only about 8 coals on top and 4 coals around the outside of the bottom (not underneath). Cook for 30 minutes, or until the cheese has melted. Make sure to keep a close eye on this recipe, because with all those delicate ingredients it's very sensitive.

Reprinted with permission from Ultimate Camp Cooking by Mike Faverman and Pat Mac. Andrews McMeel Publishing; Original edition (February 8, 2011)

Yield: 
4-6 servings
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