Corned Beef

iStockphoto
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 gal/5.76 L water
  • 1 lb to 1 lb 4 oz/454 to 567 g kosher salt
  • 5 oz/142 g granulated sugar
  • 3 1/2 oz/99 g Insta Cure No. 1
  • 3 garlic cloves, mashed
  • 1 tbsp/15 mL pickling spice, crushed
  • 1 beef brisket

Instructions

1. In a stockpot, combine the water, salt, sugar, and Insta Cure. Purée the garlic and pickling spice in a blender with about 1 cup/240 mL of the brine. Combine the puréed mixture with the brine.

2. Bring the brine to a boil. Remove from the heat and cool to room temperature.

3. Weigh the brisket and inject the brisket with brine equal to about 10 percent of its weight.

4. Place the brisket in a brining tub and add enough brine to submerge it. Use a plate or plastic wrap to keep it completely below the surface. Brine the brisket for 3 days under refrigeration.

5. After 3 days, drain the brisket. Place it in a stockpot.

6. Add enough water to cover the brisket. Simmer for 3 hours, or until tender.

7. Remove the brisket, split it in half, following the natural separation between the two pieces of meat (cap and brisket), and trim off the excess fat. The brisket is ready to serve. It may also be cooled, wrapped, and refrigerated for up to 2 weeks. Reheat by slicing the meat thinly and sautéing. You can also reheat it whole by placing the product in water or stock and slowly reheating to 165°F/74°C, then slice and use as required.

Note: You can use a bottom round of beef and cure like corned beef; this will give you a larger piece of meat and less fat.

Categories: 
HolidaysMain Dishes
Yield: 
Makes 1 brisket, 10-12 lb/4.54 to 5.44 kg
  • Simran Sethi: 'We're losing biodiversity in foods'

    "Globally, 95 percent of our calories now come from 30 species," says journalist and educator Simran Sethi, author of Bread, Wine, Chocolate. "Three-fourths of the food we eat comes from 12 plants and five animal species."

Top Recipes

Use less sugar in baking by treating it as a spice

"Instead of thinking about [sugar] as an evil ingredient, I thought maybe we can just go back in history a little bit and think about a time when sugar was one of the many spices that people used to flavor their foods," says Sam Seneviratne, author of The New Sugar and Spice.