Coppa-and-Gorgonzola Piadine

John Kernick

Star chef Mario Batali's terrific flatbread sandwiches are topped with slices of creamy Gorgonzola dolce and coppa as soon as they're taken off the griddle.

Dough

  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt 
  • 1/4 cup lard or solid vegetable shortening, at room temperature 
  • 1 cup water

Toppings 

  • 1 1/2 pounds Gorgonzola dolce, thinly sliced 
  • 1/2 pound sliced spicy coppa 
  • 2 thinly sliced Bartlett pears 

Make the dough: In a standing mixer fitted with the dough hook, blend the flour, baking soda, salt and lard at medium-low speed until the mixture resembles coarse meal. With the machine on, add the water in a thin stream and mix until the dough forms a ball. Increase the speed to medium and knead for 5 minutes.

Roll the dough into an 8-inch log and cut into 12 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and arrange on a baking sheet. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Heat a cast-iron griddle over moderate heat. On an unfloured work surface, roll out each ball of dough to a thin 7-inch round. Working in batches, griddle the piadine just until lightly browned on the bottom, 1 to 2 minutes. Turn and brown the other side, 1 minute more. Keep the piadine warm in foil in a preheated oven while you cook the rest.

Add the toppings: Arrange the warm piadine on a platter or plates. Top with the sliced Gorgonzola, coppa and pears and serve.

Suggested pairing: A sparkling wine, like an Italian Lambrusco.

 From Food & Wine (April 2013), contributed by Mario Batali

Prep time: 
35 minutes
Total time: 
1 hour
Yield: 
12 piadine
  • David Sedaris on his father: 'He would eat in his underpants'

    With more than 7 million copies of his books in print, humorist and satirist David Sedaris looks at the sides of life that most of us would not even notice. The author of Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls explains why his father would dine in underpants.

Top Recipes

Regional food is more than hamburgers and hotdogs; it's 'a national legacy'

Roadfood, by Jane and Michael Stern, was published in 1977 and became a classic that is now in its ninth edition. Michael says regional food is "a national legacy, a heritage that's well worth preserving."