Citrus Collards with Raisins Redux

This recipe was the seed of Vegan Soul Kitchen: Fresh, Healthy, and Creative African-American Cuisine and a tribute to author Bryant Terry’s home city of Memphis.

Ingredients

  • Coarse sea salt
  • 2 large bunches collard greens, ribs removed, cut into a Chiffonade, rinsed and drained
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2/3 cup raisins
  • 1/3 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

Instructions

1. In a large pot over high heat, bring 3 quarts of water to a boil and add 1 tablespoons salt. Add the collards and cook, uncovered, for 8 to 10 minutes, until softened. Meanwhile, prepare a large bowl of ice water to cool the collards.

2. Remove the collards from the heat, drain, and plunge them into the bowl of cold water to stop cooking and set the color of the greens. Drain by gently pressing the greens against a colander.

3. In a medium-size sauté pan, combine the olive oil and the garlic and raise the heat to medium. Sauté for 1 minute. Add the collards, raisins, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring frequently.

4. Add orange juice and cook for an additional 15 seconds. Do not overcook (collards should be bright green). Season with additional salt to taste if needed and serve immediately. (This also makes a tasty filling for quesadillas.)

From Vegan Soul Kitchen: Fresh, Healthy, and Creative African-American Cuisine by Bryant Terry (Perseus Books, 2009). Copyright © 2009 by Bryant Terry.

Prep time: 
10 minutes
Cook time: 
10 minutes
Total time: 
20 minutes
Yield: 
4 servings
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