Buttermilk Cornbread

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The simplest.

Note: 
  • If you are not equipped with buttermilk, you can swap in 1 cup milk mixed with 1 teaspoon cider vinegar. 
  • This can be vegan if you substitute soy milk (plus vinegar) for the buttermilk and omit the egg. (And, of course, use olive oil.)
Ingredients
  • Nonstick spray or a little butter for the pan 
  • 1 cup cornmeal 
  • 1 cup unbleached white flour 
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt 
  • 1 tablespoon sugar 
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
  • 1 cup buttermilk 
  • 1 large egg 
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or melted butter
Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spray or butter a 9-inch square baking pan or a 10-inch diameter cast-iron skillet.

2. In a medium-sized bowl, combine all dry ingredients. It's not necessary to sift, but make sure that the sugar and the baking soda are well distributed.

3. Beat together buttermilk, egg, and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients, pour in the wet ingredients, and mix thoroughly with a few quick strokes.

4. Spread the batter into the prepared pan and bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until a knife probing the center comes out clean. 

Copyright Tante Malka, Inc. By Mollie Katzen, author of The Heart of the Plate.

Yield: 
6-8 servings

  • A look at the history of sugar, from art and language to 3-D printing

    Darra Goldstein is editor in chief of The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets, an 888-page reference guide to all things sweet. "The book is really a compendium of human desires, a cultural history of desire for things that are sweet and what it has caused in the world, in both the realm of pleasure and also of pain," she says.

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